NURS4412 Applied Social Science for Enrolled Nurses

Assignment 2

Task Description

Using the scenario below, you are required to write an essay identifying and discussing the relevant legislation and codes related to Mr Smith’s experience of EN Francis Brown’s nursing care.

Mr Smith is 85 years old. He was admitted to a medical ward for assessment after his GP became concerned that he had several falls at home. EN Francis Brown, assisted the RN with his nursing admission. She introduced herself and asked him for permission to complete his baseline recordings and general health survey. Francis was able to answer questions that he had regarding the ward routine. Mr Smith was concerned that he would not be able to attend his regular church meeting, Francis reassured him that she could arrange for a Chaplain to visit him on the ward if required.

Later in the duty Mr Smith rang his call bell to inform Francis that he was ‘uncomfortable. She completed a pain assessment and discussed the results with her RN. She administered the prescribed analgesia to Mr Smith with supervision by her RN and recorded the dose in his medication chart.

The next day when Francis returned to duty, she answered the ward telephone. It was a person who identified themselves as a ‘good friend of Mr Smith”. They wanted to know how long he would be in hospital. Francis replied that she was not able to provide this information as the caller was not listed as Mr Smith’s next of kin but that she could take details so Mr Smith could contact the caller directly.

ESSAY WRITING

In this scenario, Mr Smith who is 85 years of age got admitted to the medical ward for an assessment after his doctor was concerned that Mr Smith had many falls at home. EN Francis Brown assisted with the care when Mr Smith was admitted to the hospital. This essay will discuss the two legislations that relate to the care given to Mr Smith “Health and Disability Commissioner Act (1994)” and “the Privacy Act (2020)” respectively. This essay will also discuss the one relevant ethical principle that was sustained for the care of Mr Smith and the two codes of conduct practices that EN Francis Brown used when providing nursing care to Mr Smith.

The New Zealand Health and Disability Commissioner Act (1994) defines the commissioner’s functions and powers. It also involves establishing a health and disability service consumer advocacy service. Additionally, it provides for the implementation of a code of health and disability services for consumers’ rights and provides a reasonable, simple, fast and effective resolution to complaints. This scenario matches rule 5 of The Code of Health and Disability Services Consumers’ Rights(1996). According to this rule, “every consumer has the right to effective communication in a form, language, and manner that enables the consumer to understand the information provided. where necessary and reasonably practicable, this includes the right to a competent interpreter” (The Code of Health and Disability Services Consumers’ Rights, 1996). The first step in effective communication is to establish that the client can hear and understand communication. The second step is to have a positive attitude toward the health consumer. The third step is to respect the health consumer and be non-judgemental, empathetic and genuine. Francis Brown communicated openly, honestly and effectively with Mr Smith. The healthcare professional introduced herself to the patient and then further asked for permission for conducting baseline records as well as the general health survey. Additionally, she was able to address any questions the patient had regarding the ward routine which could also include information related to daily schedules and activities in the healthcare facility. ( HDC Code, 1996).

 The Privacy Act of 2020 aims at safeguarding the privacy of an individual by incorporating the system for protecting a person’s right to privacy with respect to their personal and confidential information. This involves ensuring that individuals hold the ability to access their personal information. This Code of Practice is made under section 32 of the Privacy Act 2020 by the Privacy Commissioner. In the present scenario, Francis Brown uses rule 11 of the privacy code which states “limits on the disclosure of health information”(1) (P. 11) (Health Information Privacy Code, 2020). The nurse protects Mr Smith’s privacy by refusing to provide personal information to the individual who claimed to be a friend of Mr Smith. She did not share the information as the caller was not on the next of kin list. Instead, Francis Brown took the details of the caller to forward them to Mr Smith (P. Code, 2020).

The 2012 Code of Conduct highlights appropriate conduct for nurses and serves as a reference for healthcare employers, consumers, the Nursing Council as well as other organizations to evaluate the behaviour of nurses. However, failing to adhere to these standards of behaviour could result in a disciplinary investigation. To foster nursing relationships that promote the health as well as the well-being of healthcare consumers, colleagues, and families, it is crucial to treat them with respect. However, treating someone with respect involves acknowledging their dignity, value and individuality in one’s behaviour towards them. This is a significant aspect of ethical conduct and professional nursing relationships. Principle 1 of the code of conduct “to respect the dignity and individuality of health consumer” and standard 1.6 which states that “practise in a way that respects difference and does not discriminate against those in your care on the basis of ethnicity, religion, gender, sexual orientation, political other opinions, disability or age” (p. 4) (Code of Conduct, 2012). In this scenario, Francis Brown shows respect towards Mr Smith’s religious needs by providing health consumers with a chance to fulfil his spiritual needs freely while he is in the hospital.

Furthermore, principle 4  of the code of conduct is to “maintain consumer trust by providing safe and competent care” and standard 4.4(p.6) states that “recognise and work within the limits of your competence and your scope of practice” (Code of Conduct, 2012). Francis Brown administered medicine under the direct delegation and supervision of a registered nurse within the Enrolled Nurse’s scope of practice. Nurses who work in the expanded scope of practice must make sure that the health services they provide align with their education as well as assessed competence. They must also comply with the legislative requirements and also follow appropriate standards to ensure that the care that is provided by them is of high quality and meets the expectations of professionals (NCNZ, 2010).

Additionally, The Code of Ethics (2019) is designed to assist nurses in analysing as well as addressing ethical issues that can arise during their practice. However, nurses who possess knowledge of ethics and relevant processes and framework are better equipped to handle situations that initially requires ethical decision-making. This Code acknowledges the principles of participation, protection, and partnership between nursing as well as Maori. According to the context of the principles of Beneficence “Partnerships are developed that are experienced by clients as safe and beneficial and from which ‘good’ results”( p. 17) (Code of Ethics, 2019). It reflects on the concept of doing good. Francis Brown performs care collaboratively to achieve healthcare goals without harming healthcare consumers (Code of Ethics, 2019).

In conclusion, Nurse Francis Brown takes accountability for ensuring that her practice of nursing as well as her behaviour adheres to the professional, ethical and legally mandated standards. She adhered to Rule 5 of The Code of Health and Disability Services Consumer Rights (1996) and effectively communicated with health consumer regarding the ward routine.  Francis Brown uses Rule 11 of the Health Information Privacy Code 2020 and refuses to provide personal information to the caller who claimed to be Mr Smith’s friend instead, she took the details of the caller to forward it to Mr Smith to contact him directly. Francis Brown also demonstrated principle 1 of the code of conduct “to respect the dignity and individuality of health consumers” and standard 1.6 “to practise in a way that respects difference and does not discriminate against those in your care on the basis of ethnicity, religion, gender, sexual orientation, political other opinions, disability or age”. Francis Brown respected Mr Smith’s religious needs by providing him with an opportunity to practise his faith while he is in the hospital. Furthermore, Francis Brown uses principle 4 of the Code of Conduct to “maintain consumer trust by providing safe and competent care” and standard 4.4 which states that “recognise and work within the limits of your competence and your scope of practice”. Francis Brown administered medicine under the direct delegation and supervision of a registered nurse within the Enrolled Nurse’s scope of practice. Finally, Nurse Francis Brown demonstrated the principle of beneficence and worked collaboratively with their client to achieve positive results without harming her client.   

References:

Health and Disability Commissioner. (1996). Code of Health and Disability Services Consumers’ Rights.

https://www.hdc.org.nz/your-rights/about-the-code/code-of-health-and-disability-services-consumers-rights/

Privacy commissioner. (2020). Health Information Privacy Code 2020.

https://www.privacy.org.nz/privacy-act-2020/codes-of-practice/hipc2020/

Nursing Council New Zealand. (2012, June). Code of Conduct for Nurses

https://www.nursingcouncil.org.nz/Public/Nursing/Code_of_Conduct/NCNZ/nursing-section/Code_of_Conduct.aspx

New Zealand Nurses Organisation. (2019). Code of Ethics

https://www.nzno.org.nz/portals/0/publications/guideline
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